A Holistic Approach For Homewood

Homewood History

Homewood is a one square mile neighborhood. Once a vibrant community, it is now challenged with a vicious cycle of poverty, isolation, and disinvestment. In the mid-1800s’, Homewood was a destination for the most affluent citizens of Pittsburgh, especially with the advent of the Pennsylvania Railroad; the railroad offered a chance for wealthy residents to escape city living. By 1910, Homewood housed 30,000 residents and was considered a choice location. It was not until a shift in the demographics in the 1950s that Homewood became more racially and economically integrated. During this time, the city claimed land in the Lower Hill District for the Civic Arena which displaced roughly 8,000 residents, many of whom decided to relocate to Homewood. Because the majority of these residents could not buy homes, rental apartments popped up to fill the need (Rebuilding Together Pittsburgh, 2010). The racial balance was now such that blacks outnumbered whites, leading to the phenomenon known as, “white flight,” where upper and middle-class white citizens left Homewood.

Residential population in Homewood has decreased dramatically.

 A percent decrease of ~79% across the past 50 years.

Child

We support the children, families, and community of Homewood. Through holistic approaches and strong partnerships, we create and deliver opportunities for children to succeed throughout their lifetime. We engage with youth from birth providing year-round in-school and out-of-school supports which include mentoring, tutoring, case management, field trips, job training programs, project-based learning, and college guidance.

Family

A safe and stable home plays a large role in a child’s development. That is why our work extends to the parents and guardians who act as children’s first and continuing teachers. Our initiatives are based on the theory that improving adult capabilities to handle life’s challenges improves overall child outcomes. We connect families to resources that include continuing education, case-management, job training, and anti-poverty programs.

Community

As we serve the community’s residents it is important to acknowledge their lived environment. In creating a healthy future, Pittsburgh and Homewood in particular, will need to address environmental concerns such as air and water quality, stormwater management, and renewable energy sources to light and power our homes. That is why we advocate for sustainable community development which puts people first.

Research

Our work is backed by powerful research and continuous evaluation. This ensures that we meet rigorous standards informed by the most recent research in education, health, and community.

Our Offices

Full Service Community Schools

Full Service Community Schools

FSCS

Child and Community Health

Child and Community Health

FSCS

Promise Fulfillment

Promise Fulfillment

OPF

Research and Evaluation

Research and Evaluation

ORE